Join The Community

Connect, showcase, get feedback and grow as a songwriter. Join the Frettie community today!

Crickets - Guitar/Vocal

Brent Baxter

March 20, 2015

Genre: Country

More by Brent


Likes

Our Sponsors

Hit songwriter reveals how to write songs that artists want to cut!

Likes:

Views: 1243

Responses: 4




Share

Report

About This Song


I wrote this song with Lisa Shaffer and Bill Whyte. It was recorded by Joe Nichols on his album, "Crickets." Here's the guitar/vocal that we pitched to them. The vocal is by Kevin Denney.


4 Responses


Jayne Sachs

Cool song.  Made for Joe Nichols it seems!

March 31, 2015

Dennis Field

I’ve not heard this one before. Great Joe Nichols vibe. I get a nice chuckle out of it each time the crickets come in. Subtle touch but works sooo well. Loved the guitar solo! I miss those types of solos in songs. Now off to listen to the Joe Nichols version.

April 03, 2015

Ronnie Glenn

Bill Whyte? Wow, I miss him up here on the radio in Cincinnati.  I enjoy listening to guitar/vocal demos like this vs full demos. Helps me as a songwriter to hear the lyric and chord structure along with the melody better.

I really like how the story sticks to that one moment in time and how it didn’t repeat the chorus for a third time around like all the other songs on the radio after the bridge. Ending the song with the tag lines and the sounds of crickets gives it an indication that time never stops.

Kevin Denney nailed the demo. Great album title cut Brent. Thank you for sharing.

February 06, 2017

No members have liked this comment.

Cameron Scott

This song is very well produced and it sounds excellent.

February 16, 2017

No members have liked this comment.


You must be signed in to post feedback.


1

Jayne Sachs

Cool song.  Made for Joe Nichols it seems!

March 31, 2015

1

Dennis Field

I’ve not heard this one before. Great Joe Nichols vibe. I get a nice chuckle out of it each time the crickets come in. Subtle touch but works sooo well. Loved the guitar solo! I miss those types of solos in songs. Now off to listen to the Joe Nichols version.

April 03, 2015

0

Ronnie Glenn

Bill Whyte? Wow, I miss him up here on the radio in Cincinnati.  I enjoy listening to guitar/vocal demos like this vs full demos. Helps me as a songwriter to hear the lyric and chord structure along with the melody better.

I really like how the story sticks to that one moment in time and how it didn’t repeat the chorus for a third time around like all the other songs on the radio after the bridge. Ending the song with the tag lines and the sounds of crickets gives it an indication that time never stops.

Kevin Denney nailed the demo. Great album title cut Brent. Thank you for sharing.

February 06, 2017

0

Cameron Scott

This song is very well produced and it sounds excellent.

February 16, 2017


Crickets - Guitar/Vocal

Written by Brent Baxter

(Brent Baxter, Lisa Shaffer, Bill Whyte)

VERSE:
Past the cotton fields
And the old Spring Mill
We laid a blanket out where the world is still
Where nothing but a quarter moon lights up the dark
Just me and her
Lettin’ nature work
When it feels so right, no need for words
All cuddled up, just listenin’ to our hearts… And the…

CHORUS:
Crickets, itty bitty crickets
Ain’t another sound
For miles around, just listen
It’s quiet, real quiet
When the crickets start chirpin’, Lord, don’t they say it all

VERSE:
It was going great
Just our third date
We were taking it slow, but getting carried away
Never thought you could fall so far so soon
It could’a been her eyes
Or the Boone’s Farm wine
But either way, my tongue came untied
And we both heard me say, “I love you”

CHORUS:
Crickets, nothing but crickets
Ain’t another sound
For miles around, just listen
It’s quiet, real quiet
When the crickets start chirpin’, Lord, don’t they say it all

BRIDGE:
Might’ve been seconds but it felt like an hour
Then she gave me a kiss, said, “It’s all worked out
Got my mama’s white dress, my grandma’s ring
I know a little church, baby, what do you think?”
She said, “What do you think?”

CHORUS:
[SOLO]
It’s quiet, real quiet
When the crickets start chirpin’, Lord don’t they say it all

TAG:
Crickets, itty bitty crickets
When the crickets start chirpin’, Lord don’t they say it all

Here’s a look at some of the choices we made when writing Joe Nichols’ “Crickets.”

Bill Whyte and Lisa Shaffer invited me in on the idea of writing a funny song about awkward silences called “Crickets.” This led me to my first decision...

1. Do I want to write this idea?
I figured there were several versions of that idea being written and pitched around Music Row, and that was a negative for me. However, I hadn’t ACTUALLY heard it written before, so I decided the idea was still up for grabs if we wrote “the” version of it. I decided to jump in . If nothing else, I figured it’d be a lot of fun.

2. What kind of song is it?
Well, it’s called “Crickets,” and it’s about awkward silences. Given that subject matter, we felt it had to be pretty country and pretty funny. Neither of those things was (or is) the favored flavor at radio, but we figured it was best to serve that particular song.

3. Is this a novelty song?
We could’ve written a novelty song- an over-the-top whacky Ray Stevens comedy song (Bill and I both have cuts by Ray). But we knew the idea, if written right, had a bigger potential market in mainstream country. So we decided to keep it more grounded and relatable.

4. To we tell one story or several?
We could have written each verse as a stand-alone funny story which led to a general chorus. But that’s also the obvious way to write it. And we didn’t want to do the obvious. We decided to tackle the challenge of giving the song the “power of the present” - of diving into one story that has two or three “crickets” moments in a very compressed time frame. Why? For one thing, “3-act play” story songs aren’t getting cut very much. The time frame of most songs right now is... right now. Also, it would allow us to really immerse the listener into one story verses the more-expected “here are three separate unrelated stories we have to set up and tell in each of two verses and a bridge about a guy that sticks his foot in his mouth.” Plus, we figured that although it’d be harder and we’d have to be more creative, it’d be awesome if we could pull it off.

5. How do we maximize the song’s commercial potential?
We made the song about one night- one story- to engage the listener more and not have to spend so much time on setting up each joke. We also put it in the contest of a love story- the biggest commercial subject. We also made sure the awkward moments weren’t caused by the singer saying something that would be a radio-killer: something too offensive for mainstream appeal. We wanted the singer to be likable and someone the artist wouldn’t mind being for 3 minutes (an an album forever). We also put the singer on BOTH sides of the crickets moment, which we thought was unexpected and fresh.

So, there’s an overview of some of the writing decisions for “Crickets.” Even though we knew we were bucking trends by writing something more country and more funny, we made decisions within that framework to give the song maximum commercial appeal.

I hope our songwriting decisions will help YOU make better songwriting decisions!

×