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A Barfly’s Benediction

Kyle Mercer

February 17, 2018

Genre: Country

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About This Song


A rough work tape for a little country-styled novelty song.

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Any comments welcome -- the more, the better.


4 Responses


Sandra Lyerly

Haha! I gotta say its a nice little song. I like what you did and what you were going for. I would have zero idea how to market the song to hit it big or whatever, but I could see it as a little song on part of an album that just makes the listener smile and then onto the next one. I’m going to listen to more of your stuff but I just read your bio about how this is a fictitious band and persona. Honestly, I like it! Its a good idea and creative! Gonna listen to more! smile

February 21, 2018

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Kyle Mercer

Thank you. My stuff doesn’t draw much commentary, pro or con, and because I’m not a performer with access to live audience feedback, I really appreciate it when someone takes the time to say something.

February 21, 2018

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Gordon Donaldson

A funny, little song that I could see it in the hands of a comedian who sings or comedy singer. Well done. I think another verse inbetween one and two would be great, as this might be a little short for someone to record. Anyway, I want to hear more!

February 21, 2018

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Kyle Mercer

Thanks for commenting, Gordon—I really appreciate it.

It’s been at least 6 or 7 years since I wrote the piece, but I think I my early drafts had a middle verse stuck in there. The way I remember it, I wasn’t happy with what I had written and noticed when I took it out, the song seemed to say everything it needed to. Which was unfortunate, because yes, you’re right, it’s too damn short.

Now what I’m about to say next may seem a little beside-the-point at first, but back around the turn of the century, I had the chance to study playwriting with Edward Albee for one semester. Ten-minute play festivals were popular at the time and apparently were a theatrical fashion Mr. Albee was not happy with. Whenever the subject came up, he would start talking about how a play should be as long as it needed to be to say what it needed to say and then it should end. (And he would always emphasize the word ‘end’ with a distinctive arch of the eyebrows so everybody would know he meant business.)

Although I had some small success on the ten-minute festival circuit back then, I have always tried to keep Mr. Albee’s advice in mind and as a result, I now find myself in possession of songs that run under a minute, songs that run more than five and a half minutes, a short story that clocks in at over 10,000 words and a novel that comes in at under 50,000—lengths that make them all difficult-if-not-impossible to market.

So much for the value of a college education…

February 23, 2018

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0

Sandra Lyerly

Haha! I gotta say its a nice little song. I like what you did and what you were going for. I would have zero idea how to market the song to hit it big or whatever, but I could see it as a little song on part of an album that just makes the listener smile and then onto the next one. I’m going to listen to more of your stuff but I just read your bio about how this is a fictitious band and persona. Honestly, I like it! Its a good idea and creative! Gonna listen to more! smile

February 21, 2018

0

Kyle Mercer

Thank you. My stuff doesn’t draw much commentary, pro or con, and because I’m not a performer with access to live audience feedback, I really appreciate it when someone takes the time to say something.

February 21, 2018

0

Gordon Donaldson

A funny, little song that I could see it in the hands of a comedian who sings or comedy singer. Well done. I think another verse inbetween one and two would be great, as this might be a little short for someone to record. Anyway, I want to hear more!

February 21, 2018

0

Kyle Mercer

Thanks for commenting, Gordon—I really appreciate it.

It’s been at least 6 or 7 years since I wrote the piece, but I think I my early drafts had a middle verse stuck in there. The way I remember it, I wasn’t happy with what I had written and noticed when I took it out, the song seemed to say everything it needed to. Which was unfortunate, because yes, you’re right, it’s too damn short.

Now what I’m about to say next may seem a little beside-the-point at first, but back around the turn of the century, I had the chance to study playwriting with Edward Albee for one semester. Ten-minute play festivals were popular at the time and apparently were a theatrical fashion Mr. Albee was not happy with. Whenever the subject came up, he would start talking about how a play should be as long as it needed to be to say what it needed to say and then it should end. (And he would always emphasize the word ‘end’ with a distinctive arch of the eyebrows so everybody would know he meant business.)

Although I had some small success on the ten-minute festival circuit back then, I have always tried to keep Mr. Albee’s advice in mind and as a result, I now find myself in possession of songs that run under a minute, songs that run more than five and a half minutes, a short story that clocks in at over 10,000 words and a novel that comes in at under 50,000—lengths that make them all difficult-if-not-impossible to market.

So much for the value of a college education…

February 23, 2018


A Barfly’s Benediction

Written by Kyle Mercer

Oh Lord, don't let Jesus find me
Don't tell Him I'm here in this bar
I swear on my grave
I don't wanna be saved
Hell, I'd rather be feathered and tarred

So oh Lord, please don't let Jesus find me
Let's just leave things be just as they are
I can pay for my own sins
With tonic and gin
I'll find Grace in the back seat of her car.

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